I’d rather be doing a sport than cheering for someone

To the Editor:

Cheerleading is a waste of girls’ and boys’ time.  Cheerleaders are either on the sidelines, throwing each other up in the air like rag dolls, or chanting, "Here we go Dutchmen, here we go."  Or in a "cheer gym," tumbling on a mat and throwing each other up in the air.

I was a Guilderland Pop Warner cheerleader when I was in elementary school. So I do have a taste of how it is in the "cheer world." To me, it wasn't that much fun. I always thought it was a waste of my time, and now I am a wrestler and a football player.

There are also people who think that cheerleading should be in the Olympics. I don't think it should and neither does Justin Lesch. He told writers how he felt about cheerleading in Sports Illustrated.  He said, "Some people don't even watch cheerleaders at the games, so why make it a pro sport?"

Even on the website Cheerleading Daily, a writer said, "It shouldn't be in the Olympics because it wouldn't fit in with all the other sports."

Cheerleading is one of the most dangerous sports to come across. More and more girls get hurt because of what they do.

I don't even think that cheerleading should be a sport, but it is.  Cheerleaders do work very hard on their routines and cheers.  They do have a specific gym just for cheerleaders called a cheer gym, but chess is also a "sport" so these days I guess you can try to get anything called a sport.

Cheerleading shouldn't be considered a sport and shouldn't be in the Olympics either. I think cheerleading isn't a sport because you barely do any physical activity. You stand there throwing each other around and cheering on a team.

Maybe they should try gymnastics or dance.  Gymnasts tumble and build a lot of muscle strength and, in dance, well, you dance and also have performances and big compactions.

Or you can do what I do, and get out on the field and have fun.

Hannah Durant

Guilderland

More Back to School

In the elementary school, teachers are embracing the math modules set out by the state as guides for curricula. Throughout the district, administrators are hoping hires of teaching assistants and teaching coaches will set BKW on the right track with the Common Core standards.

Guilderland has made strides in improvingg scores for students with disabilties and in closing the gap between students that come from poor homes and those that don't.

Guilderland teachers havae agreed to be evaluated through state tests so students will have to face fewers exams. Also this year, a $400,000 state "Teaching is the Core" grant will promote in-class coaching.