Giordano sentenced to eight years for burglary spree

Robert Giordano

Robert Giordano of Greene County was sentenced to eight years in state prison, following a guilty plea that Albany County District Attorney David Soares announced Friday would satisfy charges for a string of robberies in Westerlo and Coeymans.

Giordano, 24, pleaded in June to one count of second-degree burglary, a class C felony, according to Soares’s office. Judge Roger D. McDonough of Albany County Supreme Court sentenced Giordano, a second felony offender, including five years of post release supervision.

Giordano broke into residences through a glass door or window and stole common items, like jewelry, cash, or electronics, according to Cecilia Logue, a spokeswoman for Soares’s office. This is Giordano’s second felony offense in the last 10 years, she said. 

Steven Sharp, Albany County assistant district attorney of the Legal Affairs Bureau, prosecuted the case.

Giordano was arrested by State Police in April, police said, when he was found with a stolen vehicle on Route 22 in Durham, in Greene County. He had stolen items with him, said police, including electronics, jewelry, and firearms.

Giordano was charged in April with first-degree criminal possession of a weapon, three counts of second-degree burglary, and third-degree criminal possession of stolen property — all felonies. He was also charged with three misdemeanors: seventh-degree criminal possession of a controlled substance, possession of burglar’s tools, and second-degree criminally using drug paraphernalia.

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