Photos: Christmas and snow blanket Altamont

“Santa’s here, Santa’s here!” screamed the children gathered by the train track in Altamont as Santa rolled into town, culminating the annual Victorian Holiday Celebration. Inside the boxcar, tots whispered their wishes to the jolly old elf.

Earlier on Sunday, animals reigned as George Pratt’s horse, Rebel, and Toby, the corgi, went nose to nose after Toby had his picture taken with Santa at Altamont Country Values. Pratt offered horse rides to young and old. Dressed for an ugly sweater party Annie, the beagle, wearing a Christmas-tree hat, poses with Santa for her picture.

Curious about the words to Christmas carols being sung at the Altamont Reformed Church during the living Nativity, a little girl, while wearing her warm rabbit-ear muffs and pink gloves, tries to open up the program so she can sing.

The Star of Bethlehem is held aloft by angel Natalie Drahzal as Steve Parker, Kenny Adams, and David Lasselle play the roles of the three wise men. Kelly Davey, portraying Mary, sings as she holds one of her twin sons, Thomas Person, during the live Nativity at the Altamont Reformed Church on Sunday. She quipped that his brother, Andrew, who was in the crowd, was the understudy for the role of Jesus.

Although a foot of new-fallen snow kept some away, those who attended the annual event, sponsored by Altamont Community Tradition, had a festive time in the winter wonderland.

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GUILDERLAND — Forty years ago, Harold “Bud” Kenyon said, he caught a student — “a peeping tom,” he called him — looking into the girls’ locker room. A popular and successful varsity football coach, Kenyon took the boy to the high school principal’s office.

“The first two times did no good,” Kenyon told The Enterprise. The third time, when he found the boy hiding in the bleachers, he recalled, “I told him, ‘Get down’ and he said, ‘Get lost.’ I got him by the nape of the neck and the seat of the pants and took him to the office.”

That incident came back to haunt Kenyon this week as the Guilderland School Board decided, once and for all, not to name the high school football field for Kenyon as originally planned.