Judge candidates duke it out in a four-way race for two seats

GUILDERLAND — With two open spots this election year, the four-way race for town justice is hotly contested, as the Republican candidates allege that it is the current Democratic administration’s fault that the court has become so congested over the past several years.

Incumbent Democrat Denise Randall is running for re-election, along with the town's current attorney, Democrat Richard Sherwood, and Republicans Stephen DeNigris and Christopher Aldrich.

It is the crowding in the court that has led to the third town judge position. In 2009, George B. Ceresia Jr., then the Third District Administrative Judge, suggested that Guilderland elect a third judge, after statistics showed it was the third busiest court in Albany County. There was a delay in the creation of the position, because the town board had to approve it first, and then the state legislature had to authorize the decision.

In the past, just one slot has been open, but this year two are up for election. The third post is already filled by Democrat John Bailey, whose term runs for another two years.

The town board officially created the position on Jan. 1, 2013. The judge’s job pays $47,749 annually and carries a four-year term.

More Guilderland News

Officers located Basile near the reported scene and he was taken into custody.

GUILDERLAND — Forty years ago, Harold “Bud” Kenyon said, he caught a student — “a peeping tom,” he called him — looking into the girls’ locker room. A popular and successful varsity football coach, Kenyon took the boy to the high school principal’s office.

“The first two times did no good,” Kenyon told The Enterprise. The third time, when he found the boy hiding in the bleachers, he recalled, “I told him, ‘Get down’ and he said, ‘Get lost.’ I got him by the nape of the neck and the seat of the pants and took him to the office.”

That incident came back to haunt Kenyon this week as the Guilderland School Board decided, once and for all, not to name the high school football field for Kenyon as originally planned.

“This is all very disturbing,” said Donald Reeb. “It was all being handled as if it was a big secret.”