Town approves parking lot for Stuyvesant Plaza despite objections

GUILDERLAND – Stuyvesant Plaza, last week, got approval from the town to add a parking lot with 26 spaces behind T.G.I. Friday’s, despite protests from the McKownville Improvement Association.

The McKownville Reservoir Park, nearly five acres of green space behind the plaza and adjacent to Western Avenue, will lose half of an acre to the new parking lot.

“Taking away a large piece of the park is bothersome,” said Don Reeb, president of the McKownville Improvement Association. “It is a terrible hardship for McKownville.”

“It actually isn’t parkland,” said Janet Kaplan, vice president of real estate for Stuyvesant Plaza. “We have an easement from the town.”

The town approved a project to improve stormwater drainage and build the reservoir park in 2009, to help alleviate flooding issues on Western Avenue, near the plaza. The project, in addition to replacing drainage pipes, turned the former McKownville Reservoir into a pocket park, by adding trails around the small pond, benches, and picnic tables.

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Enrolled voters in Guilderland are 38 percent Democrat and 25 percent Republican; enrolled Conservatives number just 450, or 2 percent. The remaining 35 percent are enrolled in other small parties or as independents.

GUILDERLAND — Forty years ago, Harold “Bud” Kenyon said, he caught a student — “a peeping tom,” he called him — looking into the girls’ locker room. A popular and successful varsity football coach, Kenyon took the boy to the high school principal’s office.

“The first two times did no good,” Kenyon told The Enterprise. The third time, when he found the boy hiding in the bleachers, he recalled, “I told him, ‘Get down’ and he said, ‘Get lost.’ I got him by the nape of the neck and the seat of the pants and took him to the office.”

That incident came back to haunt Kenyon this week as the Guilderland School Board decided, once and for all, not to name the high school football field for Kenyon as originally planned.

ALTAMONT — After months of packed village meetings as Stewart’s proposed an expansion that would