Berne Library Notes for Thursday, September 19, 2013

— Photo by Judy Petrosillo

Ways to learn A: Kids at the Berne Library’s story time on Sept. 17 learned about the letter A and about apples. They tasted three different kinds of apples and then did a painting project.

September 22 to 28 is Banned Book Week. The American Library Association hopes to draw attention to the harms of censorship by celebrating the freedom to read. Unlike other areas of your life, your privacy is protected at the Berne Public Library. There is no record of the materials you have borrowed from the library once you return them. Take advantage of this uncensored resource.

What books on our shelves were challenged in the United States in the last year? Some examples include The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian by Alexie Sherman, Ender’s Game by Orson Scott Card, Looking for Alaska by John Green, and The Kite Runner by Khaled Hosseini.

Lego League

Youth in grades 2 through 8 are encouraged to display unlimited creativity at the Lego League program. Meet at the library on Saturday, Sept. 21, at 11 a.m. Use the library’s Legos to make a project to display for the month.

Knit Wits

The Knit Wits meet on Sunday, Sept. 22, at 7 p.m. Share problems, solutions, ideas and conversation while you work on your own project. Adults who knit or crochet are welcome to attend.

Story time

Books are the topic for story time this week as the letter B is explored. Join Kathy on Tuesday, Sept. 24, at 11 a.m. Preschool children and their caregivers will hear stories, participate in activities and make a craft during this weekly program.

Sunday Book Club

Although the next book for the Sunday Book Club has never been challenged, it is interesting. Read We Are All Welcome Here by Elizabeth Berg for the next meeting on Sunday, Oct. 6. The discussion will begin at 7 p.m. and all adults are encouraged to attend. Visit the library to request a copy of the book or request it online. Remember that there is no charge to borrow library materials.

U.S. Supreme Court Justice William Brennan, in Texas v. Johnson, said, “If there is a bedrock principle underlying the First Amendment, it is that the Government may not prohibit the expression of an idea simply because society finds the idea itself offensive or disagreeable.” Your public libraries stand behind this principle.