Mike Nardacci

Sand Beach, Maine, geology

My first experience with Acadia National Park on Mount Desert Island in Maine was in the summer of 1987 when I went as a graduate student to the College of the Atlantic in Bar Harbor for a co

When I started composing this article in my head, this thought came to me:  “tower  karst” and “Onesquethaw” — two rather obscure terms (to most people) — in one headline.  Might be an attention-gr

Geologists, I have often told my students, have a name for virtually everything.  For most people, an expression such as “debris that collects at the base of a cliff” would be sufficient to describ

With the Helderberg landscape buried under yet another huge snowstorm in this seemingly endless winter, many of the unique geological features of our area are hidden beneath the drifts.  Fortun

Caves are mysterious places even for those of us who have spent decades in exploring and trying to understand the agents of nature that formed them, and it should be noted that for a large percenta

A point I have always tried to make with my students or participants in one of my field trips is that geologists have a name for absolutely every natural process involving the rocky sphere that is

Acadia National Park on Maine’s “Down East Coast” is a place of mystical wonders:  sheer granite cliffs rising from the sea, washed in the salt spray of enormous waves crashing against them; barren

To anyone with an interest in the geology of the Helderberg Plateau, one of the pleasures of late March and early April is to take a drive around its back roads to see what the waters of the spring

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