Melissa Hale-Spencer

GUILDERLAND — The four Guilderland High School juniors arrested for cyberbullying, a misdemeanor under a 2010 Albany County law, sat in a packed Guilderland courtroom last Thursday night.

Their cases were heard first by Judge Denise Randall, in her chambers, behind a closed door.

Lynnwood Elementary students role-played in scenes about bullying and respect with Union College hockey players trying to beat the image of aggression in their sport.

Despite the disabilities and injury that have kept Kathleen Conn and her husband from steady work, they've held on to their home, and she keeps going by giving back to others.

GUILDERLAND — With Thanksgiving on the horizon, the kindergartners in Amy McFarren’s class told each other what they were thankful for.

Five-year-old Dylon Conboy told his classmates, “I’m thankful my Daddy donated platelets to kids that need them.”

Dylon knows about illness and about generosity.

"Chuck has the honest face and innocent look," said Senior Investigator Thomas Funk of his colleague, Charles Tanner III. "I’m a bigger guy — more intimidating.” The two work well together, and Funk was pleased that Tanner was recently recognized with an award from the district attorney.

GUILDERLAND — Four Guilderland High School juniors, all males, were arrested Thursday by Guilderland Police on misdemeanor charges under a 2010 Albany County law making cyberbullying a crime.

“It’s a meditation on the power of friendship," says Altamont's librarian about Breadcrumbs, one of the books recommended for winter reading.

In close votes on Oct. 14, a $17.3 million project to update Guilderland’s seven school buildings passed while an $846,300 plan to renovate the high school auditorium and better light the football field was defeated.

What the high school principal described as "raunchy sexual comments" in a rap posted to YouTube has led to the suspension of four male students; police are deciding whether they will be arrested under a county cyberbullying law, currently being challenged in the state's top court.

A nursery-school teacher, a mechanic, a chef, a student, a plumber, a bus driver all set aside their real-life roles to bring Charles Dickens's Christmas Carol to life on stage.

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