Melissa Hale-Spencer

Nicholas Fahrenkopf believes the school district needs to make long-range plans, and that his ability to analyze data to solve problems can help with that.

As a new school board member three years ago, Christine Hayes recalls taking a course where she learned “it takes a board member 2.6 years to become fully functional.” Hayes is at that point now. “I want to give back all that information I’ve been learning,” she said. “I’m learning more every day.”

Seema Rivera is a Guilderland High School graduate, a mother, a taxpayer, and an educator, all of which she says well qualify her for serving on the school board.

The central focus of next year's budget for the Guilderland Public Library is on setting aside funds to deal with problems arising in its 23-year-old building

Highway superintendents are largely pleased with extra state funds to fix winter damage; the Guilderland superintendent called the unlooked-for funds "awesome."

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"We actually have an election this year," said the school board president. Five candidates will vie for three board seats in the May 19 election.

Nine-year-old William Cleveland ended the school-bus bullying that had been tormenting his sister because the bullies knew of his expertise in taekwondo; he used his confidence but no force.

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GUILDERLAND — An extra $1.4 million in state aid led school leaders here to recommend changes for next year’s budget — putting $740,000 into savings and adding roughly $374,000 in expenses — measures school board members largely supported in a workshop Tuesday night.

Hedi McKinley says, "Why wait till you're old?" to talk to your grown children about how you want to die. She recommends reviewing a written living will every 10 years.

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Guilderland students spoke to the school board about the wonders of using applications and laptops by Google, tools that are more accessible out of class and which increase the exchanges between peers and teachers.

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